Sharing RESPOND Knowledge at the IMISCOE Annual Conference 2019

by Dr. Susan Rottmann | Özyeğin University

Some of the first findings of RESPOND were shared at one of the largest gatherings of migration researchers in Europe, the IMISCOE Annual Conference in Malmö, Sweden.

A major highlight was a workshop on the topic, “Gendered Experience of Migration and Vulnerabilities in Protection Regimes,” co-organized by Andreas Onver Cetrez and Sabine Hess.

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Migration Policy and Politics in Poland

by Konrad Pędziwiatr | Centre of Migration Research, University of Warsaw

In recent years Poland has become an increasingly attractive destination for immigrants amongst whom Ukrainians form the largest group. In 2016, it recorded the highest number of employment-related residence permits (almost half a million) for third country nationals among the EU Member States. Thus, Poland, whose citizens in the last three decades have significantly contributed to the European migration processes and form a new diaspora of over 2 million persons, is transforming from an emigration towards immigration country.

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LEAVING HOME: HOPES, BORDERS AND CHANGE

by Pınar Aksu | Glasgow Caledonian University

Recently, I have carried out interviews for the RESPOND research in Glasgow, Scotland. It was an emotional, frustrating and hopeful process, with many of the participants openly talking about their experiences. Many people leave their country for different reasons; protection, new life, hope and better future. Sadly, some are forced to leave their country, so sudden there is no time to gather memories and say final goodbyes.

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Second Roundtable of the Italian Migration Governance Network

by Andrea Terlizzi & Mattia Collini | University of Florence

The second RESPOND roundtable of the Italian Migration Governance Network was held on the 2nd of July at the University of Florence, eight months after the first one. On that occasion, the purpose was to discuss some key issues relating to the governance of the migration phenomenon in Italy. In particular, the discussion revolved around three main migration policy areas: border management, reception, and integration policies. Participants were encouraged to share different points of view and approaches and were free to raise new reflections.

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Introducing a Related Project: TRAFIG - Transnational Figurations of Displacement

by RESPOND Project

TRAFIG (Transnational Figurations of Displacement) is an EU-funded Horizon 2020 research and innovation project. From 2019 to 2021, 12 partner organisations are investigating long-lasting displacement situations at multiple sites in Asia, Africa and Europe and options to improve displaced people’s lives. The project aims to generate new knowledge to help develop solutions for protracted displacement that are tailored to the needs and capacities of persons affected by displacement.

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The need for a Stronger Integration Discourse in Turkey

by Prof. Ayhan Kaya | Bilgi University

Turkey first introduced a Temporary Protection Directive for the refugees in 2014, based on Articles 61 to 95 of the Law on Foreigners and International Protection, which came into force in April 2014. The directive grants almost the entire social and civil rights that refugees enjoy in western societies. Accordingly, Turkey has provided Syrians with temporary protection, which consists of three elements: an open-door policy for all Syrians; no forced returns to Syria (non-refoulement); and unlimited duration of stay in Turkey.

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Launching the Survey among Syrian Refugees | Experience from the workshop at the Swedish Research Institute, ISTANBUL

by Anita Brzozowska & Karolina Sobczak-Szelc | University of Warsaw

If you have ever experienced quantitative research among migrants, then you are already aware of challenges that it is linked to, and that good methodological concept, preparation and launch of the survey is a key to have high-quality data for further analysis.

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UNIFI Workshops and Seminar Series | Sirius & RESPOND researches

by Renato Ibrido | University of Florence

Contemporary societies are unavoidably “multicultural societies”, which means that a number of diverse social groups – characterized by different values, traditions, language, legal norms, religions – coexist in the same national territory. Governing such a social, political and economic diversity is one of the most compelling challenges of our time. Contemporary migration flows contribute making this challenge even engaging because on the one hand they increase critical diversity, and on the other they feed political discourses exasperating xenophobia and the “Europe first” narrative.

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